Bring Back Our Girls: 2 Years Later

Photo: Unicef Canada

Photo: Unicef Canada

Two years ago, the world witnessed the brutal abduction of 276 schoolgirls from Nigeria, who were simply studying for their classes, when their lives changed forever. While we still don’t know where many of those girls are today, at least 57 have successfully and daringly escaped. There is new hope that at least some of the girls are alive, from a video released by the terrorist group. None of the girls have been rescued and hundreds may still be in danger. The world came together to protest this gross injustice and we have to use that energy to keep moving forward in the fight for human rights.

Photo: (PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)

Photo: (PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)

Here’s a heartfelt video from one of the mothers speaking to her missing daughter. It reminds us that we all love the same way and that we need to make this world a safe place for everyone.

 

We work to care for vulnerable children around the world, who are often living in orphanages. Never has this work been more needed, as we now have so many children displaced from their homes. It’s estimated that 30 million children have been displaced due to war and conflict, which hasn’t happened since the end of World War II. Like the girls kidnapped from Nigeria, many vulnerable children are robbed of their chance to go to school. Our mission is to elevate the quality of life and break the cycle of poverty for children, and an essential part of that is education. Education is the key that opens up a world of possibilities to children and can be the difference between staying or overcoming poverty.

12347983_10153830098873410_3344536916985853471_n

We’re currently fundraising for a project in Kenya, which involves the refurbishing of 4 greenhouses on the property of the St. Catherine’s Children’s Home. Those greenhouses will allow the home to grown fresh produce, which will then be given to the 43 children living there, as well as sold in the markets. The profits gained from selling the vegetables will help pay for the school fees for the older children. Since the home is in Kenya, higher education is not a free service for children. We’ve done similar greenhouse projects to cover educational costs at the Watoto Wema Home and the Fiwagoh Home, both located in Kenya. To help these children receive the education they deserve, please visit our project site.

 

Resources:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/15/world/africa/nigeria-boko-haram.html?_r=0

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gordon-brown/bring-back-our-girls-anniversary-boko-haram_b_9692818.html

http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/14/africa/nigeria-chibok-girls-reaction/index.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/r-evon-idahosa/mothers-of-girls-stolen-by-boko-haram_b_9695826.html

http://reliefweb.int/report/world/30-million-children-displaced

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/boko-haram-chibok-schoolgirls-new-video_us_570f965fe4b0ffa5937e4768?utm_hp_ref=world&utm_hp_ref=world

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gordon-brown/bring-back-our-girls-anniversary-boko-haram_b_9692818.html?slideshow=true#gallery/351963/6  

Helping Children Accused of Witchcraft

Photo Credit: Anja Ringgren Lovén

12642892_10153924910808024_5477529554906291088_n

Anja Ringgren Lovén went to Nigeria three years ago as a humanitarian volunteer, but nothing could have prepared her for what was in store for her. Lovén is the founder of the African Children’s Aid Education and Development Foundation and is dedicating to bettering the lives of vulnerable children. While being in Nigeria, she has seen firsthand some of the thousands of children who are accused of witchcraft and the terrible consequences that children endure on account of these strong superstitions. One of those children that Lovén is helping has been starved and shunned from the community. The child is now going by the name “Hope,” which he has given to people all over the world through his story of resilience. Read more @HuffPost: goo.gl/yHWsKm

The Plight of Nigerian Girls

Nigerian girls are almost always married at very young ages, often without their consent. ⅔ of girls in Nigeria are married before they are 18 and ⅓ is married before 15. These girls go onto have an average of 7 children, remain illiterate and stuck in poverty. There is a very high maternal mortality rate for these girls and they are divorced only if the husband initiates it. There are organizations like Adolescent Initiative, or Illim, that work to educate and protect these girls. Read more about this important topic and the amazing strides being done to help:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/girls-education-niger_564ddb93e4b031745ceff27b 

X